Blown solenoid!!!

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We’ve been staying in an rv park for a few months while waiting out the COVID-19 pandemic/shutdowns. We had attempted to leave here when the travel ban was lifted and after going down the road(in the park) our rv step started acting erratically. This usually means a low battery. Ours are full. After we stopped to check it out, we realized we have no DC power and the step wouldn’t come in after opening the door.

We pulled back into the spot we were in before, hooked up to shore power once again, and checked things out. The step stayed out and we still had no DC power. The cause of this? Blown solenoid. We replaced the solenoid and tried again. Same thing happened, only this time, we had DC power, but our 110 was now out. Ugh!

Pulled into our spot again, hooked back up and checked the solenoid….. Blown…. This is the battery cutoff solenoid, by the way. We had an electrician come out. We had to get our generator serviced because it was surging. The surging caused the system to read low voltage and caused everything to go nuts and blow the solenoid.

After the generator service, It was running smooth. We replaced the solenoid again and within 2 minutes, blown. We lost DC and 110. Had the electrician come out again and wire up a big boy solenoid. It still got super hot. So we took the cables and tied the together, bypassing the solenoid. Voila! We have all power restored!

After much research, we came upon some forum posts of people with this same issue. They’d taken the solenoid off and directly connected the wires, similar to what we did. Apparently the battery cutoff solenoid is basically for disconnecting the battery bank while in storage. We live in our rig full time so this doesn’t really make sense to keep blowing this solenoid since we won’t be storing it. If we ever do store our rig, we’ll just use the primary cutoff switch in the battery bay.

Solenoids are expensive! Each solenoid we bought was between $42 and $468. The Big Boy solenoid was the most expensive.

So, if you’re full timing in your rv and your battery cutoff solenoid blows, move the cable from the right side to the left post and you’ll have power restored regardless of whether the solenoid is still blown.

Hope this helps and you were entertained by this and our other posts. Have a great adventure and enjoy life!

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